Cigarette Smoking Declines but Nicotine Use Does Not

Emerging Tobacco Products Deliver Nicotine in New Ways

by Helen Zhang, age 16

Although surveys show smoking habits have remained stagnant since 2011, the use of tobacco has grown with the introduction of new products. Emerging tobacco products such as e-cigarettes, hookahs, snus (similar to snuff in a packet) and dissolvable tobacco (similar to cough drops) are increasing in popularity among middle and high-school students in the United States.

In recent years, smoking bans in restaurants and other public spaces have contributed to a significantly lower rate of tobacco usage in adults. Meanwhile, a 2012 survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates that 6.7% of middle-school students and 23.3% of high-school students had used a tobacco product at least once in the previous 30 days. While these rates are roughly the same as those reported in 2011, the use of alternative tobacco products was drastically higher than in the previous year.

Between 2011 and 2012, the CDC found that middle school students nearly doubled their use of e-cigarettes, rising from 0.6% to 1.1%.

High school e-cigarette usage nearly doubled, rising from 1.5% to 2.8%, and dissolvable tobacco use rose from 0.4% to 0.8%. Cigar usage has also increased among youth. Many cigars are identical in size and shape to cigarettes. However, because they are not cigarettes, they are exempt from Food and Drug Administration restrictions on flavoring.

 Newer products may have also gained popularity because of their low cost, and recent media coverage. Now, e-cigarettes have multiple advertisements on television, while advertising for traditional cigarettes has been banned since 1971. Brian King, senior scientific adviser in the CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health, argues that, these products are now more easily marketed towards young consumers. In addition, anecdotal evidence popularized in the media suggests people can use these products to quit smoking. As a result, alternative tobacco options may seem like a safer,, more socially acceptable method of attaining the same effect as cigarettes.

Unfortunately, because these products are new, “There’s not a lot of information on the long-term health impact,” says King. “There is also evidence that nicotine – however it may be absorbed – may adversely affect brain development among youths.”

Statistics have shown that 90% of smokers start as teenagers. A survey published in September of 2013 discovered that one in five middle-school students, who said they had never used conventional cigarettes, reported having used e-cigarettes.

King adds, “None of these emerging products are safe alternatives to traditional cigarette use, and efforts should be made to get kids to stop so we don’t have a next generation of tobacco-addicted adults.”

As the numbers of e-cigarette users continue to rise, it is troubling to both the public and non-profit agencies. According to a statement from the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, “It is […] disconcerting that teenagers are increasingly turning to other products that are produced and sold without any federal oversight.”

[Source: CNN]

The math doesn't matter too much as there are too many vlbaaries to come down an exact number. Variables would be things like how you use the device, how you drag off it. How long and how often you use it, etc. Listen to your body. If the 8 mg liquid isn't stopping your cravings, then bump it up to 12mg and see if that works for you. It's a lot of trial and error in the beginning.I started with 11-12 mg but found I needed 24mg in the mornings to satisfy the cravings then dropped it down the rest of the day. Everyone's different so don't be afraid to try different things to find what works for you. I smoked around a pack a day (give or take) of Ultra-Lights and it took me about 2 weeks to learn the e-cig and find what worked for me. Haven't had a cig since.E-cigs do deliver less nicotine and the method of absorption is slower. So instead of that instant nicotine craving satisfaction, it will take a minute or so longer. But no big deal.The best resources I found for information is on forums. vapersforum.com and e-cigarette-forum.com have been invaluable to me in learning about these e-cigs. Switching was easy and staying off of tobacco with them is almost too easy. I smoked for over 30 years and it's been almost 9 painless months since I switched. Tobacco free with my e-cigs! I'm a happy camper!Good Luck Happy Vaping! – GillianThe math doesn't matter too much as there are too many vlbaaries to come down an exact number. Variables would be things like how you use the device, how you drag off it. How long and how often you use it, etc. Listen to your body. If the 8 mg liquid isn't stopping your cravings, then bump it up to 12mg and see if that works for you. It's a lot of trial and error in the beginning.I started with 11-12 mg but found I needed 24mg in the mornings to satisfy the cravings then dropped it down the rest of the day. Everyone's different so don't be afraid to try different things to find what works for you. I smoked around a pack a day (give or take) of Ultra-Lights and it took me about 2 weeks to learn the e-cig and find what worked for me. Haven't had a cig since.E-cigs do deliver less nicotine and the method of absorption is slower. So instead of that instant nicotine craving satisfaction, it will take a minute or so longer. But no big deal.The best resources I found for information is on forums. vapersforum.com and e-cigarette-forum.com have been invaluable to me in learning about these e-cigs. Switching was easy and staying off of tobacco with them is almost too easy. I smoked for over 30 years and it's been almost 9 painless months since I switched. Tobacco free with my e-cigs! I'm a happy camper!Good Luck Happy Vaping! (2014-12-07 01:07)
You write so hoesltny about this. Thanks for sharing! – NevaehYou write so hoesltny about this. Thanks for sharing! (2016-04-27 18:04)
Name
Location
Email
Comment