Simultaneous Vaccinations Raises Fever Risk

by Sierra Tobias, age 13

A recent study of 530 children aged six months to two years in The Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics (JAMA) suggests that children are at a 37.6 percent chance of developing a fever if simultaneously vaccinated for the flu and pneumococcal disease. This is a stark contrast from the fever rates for children who receive only one of the vaccines at a time. In fact, children who received only the flu vaccine had a 7.5 percent rate of developing a fever within one day, while children who received only the pneumococcal vaccine had a 9.5 percent rate of developing a fever within one day.

However, this research does not justify avoiding the vaccines, according to Dr. Melissa S. Stockwell, assistant professor of pediatrics at Columbia University Medical Center. She posits that simultaneously receiving the vaccines both increases their duration of protection and eliminates the need to return for a second doctor visit.

“We think it’s important that children be vaccinated, “Dr. Stockwell said. Research further suggests that the benefits of receiving the vaccines at the same time outweigh the risks. Dr. Stockwell ultimately asserts that simultaneously giving vaccines is “the best way to protect children against these serious diseases.”

[Source: The New York Times]


I really enjoyed reading this article Sierra! I wasn't aware of the fact that children have a 37.6 percent chance of developing a fever if simultaneously vaccinated for the flu and pneumococcal disease. I love learning knew things about health. Thanks! – Sarah UsecheVerona Area High School (2016-10-15 11:17)
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