A New Dinosaur Species Is Discovered


Although dinosaurs have been extinct for thousands of years, modern paleontologists are using ancient artifacts to learn more about their history. Recently, a new addition to the titanosaur species was discovered.

In 2005, an Australian man by the name of David Elliott found a pile of fossilized dinosaur bones while herding sheep on his motorbike. These bones confounded paleontologists for years.

Finally, 11 years after their discovery, paleontologists decided that the bones belonged to a new species of titanosaur that roamed the Earth 95 million years ago. Its official name is Savannasaurus elliottorum, although the Elliott family still likes to refer to the titanosaur by their original name for it, “Wade”.

Wade’s bones helped paleontologists give people an idea of what a Savannasaurus elliottorum would have looked like. Because its pelvis bones were fused, thin and light, paleontologists deduced that Wade was a new species.Wade’s bones helped paleontologists give people an idea of what a Savannasaurus elliottorum would have looked like. Because its pelvis bones were fused, thin and light, paleontologists deduced that Wade was an entirely new species.

Wade was one of the most complete sauropods found in Australia. Sauropods are the dinosaur family that titanosaurs belong to; they likely resemble hippopotamuses with long necks. Wade was an especially large sauropod, weighing about 22 tons and measuring more than 40 feet long and 20 feet high.

When conducting their research, it was hard for paleontologists to find Wade’s remains because they were trapped in a large bolder. Even though it took ten years to extract the body, paleontologists constantly look for bones like Wade's to continue to teach the public about dinosaurs.

[Source: The New York Times]

Great article Dejalina! It's always fun to learn about how we find out about new species! – BenMadison (2018-01-02 18:07)
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